The Manchurian Candidate – Review

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It has been more than fifty years since John Frankenheimer’s Cold War classic The Manchurian Candidate was first released and it still has retained its relevance when it comes to the current state of politics. Adapted from Richard Condon’s novel of the same name, there was never a more perfect time for a film like The Manchurian Candidate to come out, given as it was released amidst the Cuban Missile Crisis. Yet perhaps that was a small part of why The Manchurian Candidate was so frightening of an experience, it was timed so perfectly to that degree it still feels as if it were something that could have come out only recently with the turn of current events. Or maybe it might have been something made as a warning for what was set to come. Continue reading →

Harakiri – Review

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I love samurai films. They were among the first foreign films which I have watched, but namely I would focus on those of Akira Kurosawa, particularly Seven Samurai, which was an influential part of my own life for it brought onto myself a new means of appreciating cinema in all regard. As I were to venture into more samurai cinema, I decided to look into more that were not from Kurosawa and that was how I stumbled across Masaki Kobayashi’s Harakiri for a change. When I finished up, something hit me about Harakiri in a way that I wouldn’t have expected from samurai films. In some strange manner, Harakiri was almost a rather philosophical experience. As it continues to reside inside my own thought, my own love for it grows much stronger, for it truly is a masterful accomplishment on many grounds. Continue reading →

Lawrence of Arabia – Review

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Thomas Edward Lawrence was no ordinary man indeed, he was not a hero, but never a bad guy. He had an ego, but where Lawrence of Arabia is most successful is in its picture of Lawrence, as David Lean is not interested in making the man your typical Hollywood hero. David Lean is a man who is fascinated with the figure that Lawrence has left behind, and leaves a picture with honesty in regards to what he was like. Lean knows and understands what his character was like, from the many achievements and mistakes that he has made through all his life, and thus, what’s left behind is truly one of the most magical of experiences to be had with anything cinematic – this here exerts the true power of film. Continue reading →