Alien – Review

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Ridley Scott’s Alien remains one of the defining works in both the horror and science fiction genres, a film that, like any of the best of their genres, invented a whole new universe by starting small. From the many films that the Alien series has spawned, Ridley Scott’s original film still remains my favourite of the bunch for good reason. It remains my favourite because it shows how little is necessary in order to start a universe of its own from scratch. Although eventually this rule was broken by eventual sequels (as much as I love James Cameron’s Aliens), it’s already impossible to deny the impact that Ridley Scott’s original film would have left behind on science fiction and horror within years to come. In itself it would easily have been just a “haunted house movie in space,” but perhaps there’s a whole lot more that results in the final product actually turning out to be all the more clever.

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Being There – Review

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“I’m Chance, the Gardener,” says Peter Sellers inside his final noteworthy role. “Since I was a child, I worked in this garden.” He really was a gardener. “I like to watch TV.” What I said there to myself, “You know what, Chance, so do I.” In this final role, Peter Sellers is playing a man within a shelter, one that rings so perfectly with myself – maybe a reflection of myself in the mirror. Inside of a role as an innocent, simple-minded gardener oblivious to the many happenings around him only learning more from the glance at a screen, it is not only Peter Sellers to credit, but Hal Ashby as well, for creating one of the most resonant works of art ever made in Being There. One’s thoughtfulness inside of such a film only calls for a sense of self-reflection, but said process is already frustrating enough on my end.

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The In-Laws – Review

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Was at first unsure what to expect of The In-Laws by looking at promotional material, but what I got was something that took me out of nowhere. What I certainly expected of Arthur Hiller’s cult classic was that it would be a very funny film indeed and that is what I got, but what I did not expect was that it would be just as dark as it is also uproarious. It would be clear already that shenanigans are sure to keep one’s attention from the odd pairing of both Alan Arkin and Peter Falk, but there’s something about the timing that turns The In-Laws into more than just a delightful comedy. It’s a cynical film that uses said aspect in order to heighten its own spirits together with its own charm and on that count, I absolutely love it. Continue reading →

All That Jazz – Review

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Behind the glamour that one imagines inside of working in the entertainment industry, there’s that miserable soul behind it all who essentially works himself to death. A metaphor representing director Bob Fosse, who notably was staging Chicago yet editing his Academy Award-nominated Lenny at the same time, Fosse’s semi-autobiographical tale, All That Jazz, is not only a picture of the experience in show business, but it is also one of the most, if not the most innovative musicals of its very own kind – such a wonder only comes once in a lifetime it is merely unbelievable. Continue reading →