‘Wild at Heart’ Review: A Tender, Twisted, Dark Love Story from David Lynch

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David Lynch’s Wild at Heart received the Palme d’Or from the Cannes Film Festival in 1990, yet it still seems to have remained heavily underrated in his filmography. Among many things that one could ever find themselves loving about Wild at Heart, it’s also like looking at a new side of the David Lynch that one would be familiar with and even if the sudden shift in tone may not work for the most dedicated of his fans, it still results in what I see to be one of his most beautiful films by far. If there’s any other way to describe Wild at Heart, it would only be fitting to describe it as the happiest film that David Lynch might ever leave us behind with, but it still perfectly blends together all the distinctive elements of surrealism in order to create one of the most romantic movies that could ever have been made too.

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‘GoodFellas’ Review: Confronting a Life in False Glamour Right In Front of Your Eyes

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It’s easy to remember the films that sparked your own love of film at one point of your life or another, and during my early teens, one of those films was none other than Martin Scorsese’s GoodFellas. As an impressionable teenager who was pushing myself to watch more films in general, I remember first watching this on a television broadcast and I’ve been watching it again and again every chance I had; whether it be on subsequent reruns or at my own home to that point where every beat had been rooted so deeply in my head. And although it may not be my favourite Martin Scorsese film, it still encapsulates everything that I find to be what makes his work so wholly wonderful.

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Total Recall – Review

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My first memories of Total Recall have gone on in the same way that my own for RoboCop had. I was thirteen years old and I saw both films back to back on television (where they were both uncensored, surprisingly) and although both had been helpful factors in allowing myself to accept the sight of graphic violence on the screen, I merely came out just liking them because all I saw was an action film. Growing older was a different story as I looked into these films and suddenly saw another layer of brilliance on Paul Verhoeven’s end, the loud satire it presents in your face. With a Philip K. Dick story and Arnold Schwarzenegger in the lead, he’s clearly at some of his most inviting. And with Total Recall, there comes Arnold Schwarzenegger’s best film yet.

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Home Alone – Review

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Home Alone was never one of my favourite Christmas films growing up even though over the years I had never passed it by whenever it was on television. In truth over the years I had only found myself liking the film much less and eventually my own growing disdain had become enough for me just to outright dislike it. I’ve mentioned my many issues especially with the films of John Hughes as a director and quite frankly I can’t say that his work as a writer fared much better with me. Even during the time I remember enjoying Home Alone I always struggled seeing why it was labelled as a favourite and over the years hoping my view would change it becomes much stronger instead.

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Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III – Review

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Now that Tobe Hooper’s gone off the Texas Chainsaw Massacreseries, the film had ended up landing within the hands of Jeff Burr – someone who seems so relatively unknown prior to even having his own hands laid on what would eventually grow to become one of the most iconic titles in horror movie history. The removal of Tobe Hooper is one step already for what would already become a big step down but the hole has proven itself to have become much deeper when an inexperienced director is given responsibility, as Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre IIIshows the very worst tendencies of what happens when something that started off in a minimalist manner ends up getting overblown to the point, the wrong ideas of handling it come about – and something messy is to come by. Continue reading →