In Conversation with Amanda Kramer: A Talk About Female Perspectives on Cinema

CONTENT WARNING: The following conversation includes talks of sexual assault and toxic masculinity, which may be potentially upsetting for certain readers and listeners.

Following TIFF Next Wave, I had the chance to talk with Ladyworld writer-director Amanda Kramer about her creative process and her many influences. What soon followed was a long conversation about the state of the film industry and how important it is for female voices to climb higher up within in a male-dominant field. You can listen to the conversation below and also read it down below.

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Mikey and Nicky Review: Elaine May Breaks Down Masculinity to its Core

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Although Mike Nichols had already been established as a well-regarded auteur (and not without good reason), his comedy partner Elaine May was robbed of having the same legendary status after her third film. Which is utterly baffling to me, because there’s a particularly unflinching angle in Mikey and Nicky that many crime dramas of the time period had never captured, and it’s also what made this film so terrifying on the inside. But to think that this was the sort of film that Elaine May, whose best-known works have often come by in the comedy genre, makes it even more astounding because it’s clear enough that this film was made with a skilled eye that already would be placing her among many of the all-time greats, had her career really taken off to the degree that it absolutely deserved to. Like many great artists who get their start in the comedy genre, Elaine May sought to branch out even further with Mikey and Nicky but for many more reasons I also consider this to be her best film yet. And to me, there’s nothing more shameful than the fact we never got to see Elaine May create more films of this sort.

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Rosemary’s Baby – Review

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I still have very vivid memories of the first time when I watched Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby – it was at a point in my life when my interest in the horror genre was only steadily growing and I stumbled across it as it was playing on television. I could not stop thinking about the film ever since, and thus I watched it again at my next opportunity. But I quickly begun to realize why Rosemary’s Baby had grabbed me in the manner that it did, for Roman Polanski’s American debut still feels timeless – and remains one of the very best horror films ever to have been made. It’s a horror film that isn’t limited to excelling as one of the best of its genre, but among many more reasons it has only stuck around over the years so beautifully it goes down to the bone of where our fears are built.

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