‘Children of Men’ Review: Searching for Hope in the Darkest of Times

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When talking about the greatest science fiction films of the 21st century, for me only one film comes to mind when talking about the very best of such and that film is none other than Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men. Although its setting into the future may not have exactly predicted the turn of events in our world to come, there’s still something scary about the fact that we as a species have come so dangerously close to approaching the chaotic world that Children of Men shows us especially if the political climate only ever encourages such mayhem. Worth noting is the fact that Children of Men had barely made enough money to recoup its budget back when it came out, only being reflective of what it feels to be ignored when a message so important needs to find its way to get out. You’ll only watch a film like this wondering how come it actually happens to be so prescient, but at the same time you’d never want any of this to feel like it could become our own reality. You don’t ever want to see something like this happening, and you can continue telling yourself that it won’t ever become the truth, but that’s what makes Children of Men stick its landing so beautifully.

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Sofia Coppola’s Marie Antoinette Lives in the Glamour to the Fullest

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Sofia Coppola’s body of work has always remained intriguing even when she isn’t exactly the most consistent filmmaker. It’s hard enough to imagine how she can follow up a film as beautiful as Lost in Translation but there was always the certain fear that after having directed her best film she would turn out another effort that proves itself hugely underwhelming and with Marie Antoinette comes the film that consensus has agreed upon as their worst effort to date but I also think it also makes a great case as to why her work is so intriguing. Given what would be expected of a period piece, especially one about the ill-fated Queen of France, it seems only fitting that Sofia Coppola took this outline and directed a film that details her life the way that one would only be able to imagine it must have been from her very own eyes, rather than one that sticks to tradition.

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The Fountain – Review

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There was a point I remember having loved the films of Darren Aronofsky, and back then I remembered not liking The Fountain much. But now I’ve only found his films to be strenuous experiences aside from The Wrestler, and with all of this in mind I was not especially compelled to give The Fountain another go. To say the least, I’ve only found myself warming up to The Fountain more on rewatch, because it seems to be a case where Aronofsky is both maintaining his own style and telling a story that I’m not even sure can be repeated in the same manner. Aronofsky had always been a director who appears to do so much for the eyes yet his narratives are not quite the same level, oftentimes to the most excruciating results (Requiem for a Dream and Black Swan), but The Fountain is a story that only feels right being as showy as it is, it’s Aronofsky at his most expressive.

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Black Book – Review

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Paul Verhoeven’s return to his own homeland after the years he had spent in Hollywood churning out satirical classics have only proven all the more rewarding after he brings out Black Book. Being his first film to have been made in the Netherlands since The Fourth Man, Black Book brings back that touch he had made for himself during said years as he now brings said touch with eroticism and satire to the setting of WWII. In his own homeland, Black Book also holds the honour of being voted as the best Dutch film ever by the public and while that may be a stretch because I’m not so sure this would be amongst my favourite Verhoeven works, but I’ve grown up a proud apologist for his work and naturally it would mean a lesser film (minus two particularly bad films) is more impressive for many other directors’ best. With Black Book, Verhoeven satisfyingly retains this consistency.

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Pan’s Labyrinth – Review

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Many creative minds have left their touch upon the fantasy genre, but never in the way that Guillermo del Toro has offered his very own in Pan’s Labyrinth. Revolving around the concept of imagination and what it does to us as we grow older, what we are left with is not only one of the greatest fantasy films to have come out in the 21st century, but also one of the most creative projects of its own kind. It’s already one to admire the imagination of a man like Guillermo del Toro, but when watching Pan’s Labyrinth, you’re seeing everything put at its very fullest. He tells a tale that clearly is so personal to him, and the evidence is clear when you pick up on its influences, no matter what they range from: fairy tales, Victor Erice’s The Spirit of the Beehive, the hardships encountered in childhood; all forming something so magnificent in Pan’s Labyrinth. Continue reading →

United 93 – Review

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The day of September 11, 2001 is a tragic moment in all of human history and his manner of memorializing the victims of such an event in United 93 is something to which I appreciate the film for. As a film itself, however, I don’t find United 93 to be a perfect one but at best, it’s great in spite of some particularly jarring flaws which I find to detriment from the overall experience. However, such factors I find do not take away from the importance which United 93 carries, even if the overall evaluation will be rather difficult when you are considering the story and its impact on American history and the overall making of the film. It is a great film, that I have no trouble in saying, but one which I find myself moreso appreciating rather than liking fully. Continue reading →

The Covenant – Review

It wouldn’t be easy for me to describe how exactly The Covenant is just failing on so many levels but so little of any worth actually ever takes place in such a film, it’s not even worthy of a laugh. As The Covenant kept going on, there was only one expression that ran down my face the whole way through as such a displeasing experience was only left to continue. If there is something about The Covenant that I’m at least thankful for, it would be the fact that it’s relatively short, because if this dreadful film had to last any longer I would have killed myself fast enough – a good summary right there of just how poor almost everything inside of The Covenant truly is. Continue reading →

Mission: Impossible III – Review

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Many people cite Mission: Impossible II as the worst film in the series yet I’ve always had a specific dislike in regards to Mission: Impossible III. Where I admire Mission: Impossible II to an extent for John Woo’s own self-awareness to the silliness which he presents on the screen, I stand by a specific belief that Mission: Impossible III is the worst of the bunch as I find that when compared to the previous two, it’s so much more of a lazy effort. Mission: Impossible III just starts off promisingly but soon after that, everything that follows turns extremely frustrating and by that point, I simply don’t care anymore for the direction it goes.

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