Jaime’s Film Diary: March 15, 2020

As expected, I’ve been keeping my Letterboxd up to date – so here’s yet another update for here in regards to what I have been watching as of late.

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Last Minute Criterion Suggestions from Us

There’s only a few days left of the half-off sale from the Criterion Collection. If you’re a newcomer to the home video line, all of those selections can look daunting and you’ll probably stand there for a good while trying to decide what to get. With nearly a thousand titles to choose from, it’s overwhelming. Don’t worry, two Criterion aficionados have their picks that are perfect for any first-time buyer or if you’re looking for something to spice up your shelf.

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Ingmar Bergman’s Persona is One of the Most Vital Pieces of Cinema Ever Created: Review

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A film of splits, a film about unity – and what happens the moment when it breaks. A film about projection, what happens when the image does not match what one expects. A film about truth, and how it infuses with fiction to create its own realities. A film about performance, and the act of breaking character. Ingmar Bergman’s Persona is a film all about these narrative rules and what happens as soon as they break, but it is also a film that challenges the very restrictions that these rules can place upon character. Yet ultimately, Persona continues to remind you that everything you are seeing is a matter of projection. From the very opening frame to the closing shot of a film reel, but also the transferral of the thought from one vessel to the other. But if anything can better sum up an experience of this very sort, it is a film all about the restrictions of narrative expectation. For it is a film about the making of character, the making of a story, the making of its very own realities. This is a film about the crafting of a personality, and the dedication to the part – and how we all play a part into something bigger.

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Wild Strawberries – Review

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Wild Strawberries is such a conundrum of a film for someone like myself to talk about. There’s so much that happens within the course of Wild Strawberries‘s relatively short running time of 91 minutes which overwhelms the human emotion. The first moment in which I saw Wild Strawberries left me questioning the course of my life together with what I believed in, and I had not revisited it ever since because the concoction of my own expressions left me in a state, almost depressed yet I learned something more. This is something I highly admire Ingmar Bergman for, as no matter what he chooses to tackle, I always find there’s something worthy of being engrossed in. This is how I define a life-changing film, for it still managed to leave me in as much awe as it did on my first viewing. Continue reading →