Belladonna of Sadness – Review

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I could only have guessed as much that Belladonna of Sadness had played a critical factor in bringing attention to adult animation back when it had come out but for as beautiful as it may have looked, I also had found it extremely unappealing. It was a troubling experience because I recognized that there was so much about Belladonna of Sadness that was absolutely masterful, but it also mixes together with so much that also did nothing else but leave a bad taste in my mouth as they went on. Considering how this subject matter was taboo at the time for an animated feature, there’s still a reason to find one’s interest in Belladonna of Sadness growing because if went beyond such for the time, and it still does feel provocative but not for the best.

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Badlands – Review

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Terrence Malick is a filmmaker whose work has divided audiences all across the board, for there are people who would argue his work is meaningless babble with beautiful imagery and others find poetry inside of his visual storytelling. For the most part, I lean towards the latter and with his debut feature film, Badlands, it feels like so much has been accomplished on the spot even for a filmmaker developing his style. Arguably, this is Terrence Malick’s most accessible work but a certain quality to it has always had me drawn in from the first frame all the way down to the last which always had it standing out in my eyes as a work of beauty. It carries a specific gracefulness that I only wish Malick has been sticking around with as he made more films in the future and even if it were not my favourite of his, it only established something promising coming for the Texan filmmaker.

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Day for Night – Review

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Passion is one among many things that fuels life. If François Truffaut’s film Day for Night was about anything else, then there’s a much more difficult task because it’s a film that feels so in love with everything it presents but in the best way. François Truffaut, being one of the pioneers of the French New Wave with films like The 400 Blows and Jules and Jim, pays his own tribute to films through Day for Night and to those who make movies – a real treat for those who love movies in general. But maybe there’s a key to why Day for Night is anywhere near as powerful as it is. Films like Day for Night seem to make a clear statement about what’s needed most with art and how it reflects perfectly for those who watch – the love letter that films deserved just as much as filmmaking did.

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Westworld – Review

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Westworld in itself is an interesting idea – and that’s essentially what the film rides upon. That’s really all I can say for it, because the ride that Michael Crichton’s cult film provides for oneself definitely is a fun one if also one that should have been explored much more than what is already presented on the spot. What I won’t deny though is that it is easy to see why did Westworld manage to acquire a cult following, even if the product had left such an empty feeling running through my head. Being a fan of Michael Crichton’s writing I figured that there was something set for myself to love about Westworld and in part, I got that – and the other half I just got something that almost felt somewhat lacking at the same time. Continue reading →

Don’t Look Now – Review

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I can never seem to put the perfect words together in order to describe what it is that Nicolas Roeg’s classic has left upon me on subsequent revisits – for I only look back at Don’t Look Now with an impression that I had grossly understated what defines it, in my eyes, as the greatest horror film to have ever been made. Many traces of wonder are laced everywhere from the first frame to the last, all of which overwhelm me all the more when I revisit it, in fact my first impression was something I was unready for to the point I never knew what to make of it then. But it hit me soon enough why Don’t Look Now left that sort of impact on me, and within no time it was a solidified favourite of my very own. There is nothing that scares me in life other than what is set to come. All my deepest fears conjured into place, all the more reason to be mesmerized by its beauty. Continue reading →

The Crazies – Review

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One would already recognize George A. Romero’s name for the famed Living Dead film series, whose first two films still go down as being amongst the most iconic of all zombie horror films. The Crazies, one of many films that came in between Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead and it also shows an interesting experimentation with the sense of panic inside of one’s mind. While nowhere near as good as it could have been, it is still one that deserves to be viewed on the count that it develops one of the primary factors that Romero would master in order to give Dawn of the Dead the impact that it has managed to achieve over time. It was underrated during its original release, but the cult classic status it attained, deserved or not, is debatable. Continue reading →

The Exorcist – Review

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William Friedkin’s iconic The Exorcist has otherwise set a staple for the horror genre within the years to come for it exemplars what forms a truly perfect horror film. Marketed as “the scariest film of all time,” what follows may not be something that lives up to that title (I never found it scary from day one and to this day I still don’t), but something that excels in its own craft and remains a milestone for horror films of all sorts. Already a showcase in terms of the tremendous special effects, The Exorcist remains a film to define the horror genre for many reasons. Whether one finds it scary or not, to deny the exceptional crafting of such a powerful film is rather ludicrous. It is no surprise as to why it is considered the scariest film of all time in some circles, for even if it may not be my favourite of the sort, it truly is as perfect as the horror genre can ever get. Continue reading →

The Friends of Eddie Coyle – Review

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In Peter Yates’s The Friends of Eddie Coyle, there’s a unique understanding of the crime genre that’s almost difficult to find nowadays. The film is mostly quiet, but it is never boring, instead it is thoroughly entertaining. It’s a film carried through its amazing use of dialogue, it moves so smoothly and if anything there’s also something about it that gives it so much replay value. If anything, this is truly one of the great American films of the 1970’s and it also is Robert Mitchum at his finest ever since The Night of the Hunter, in this quiet, yet dark and gritty crime drama which remains one of the most overlooked of some of the very greatest examples of American cinema. Continue reading →